Here to Stay?
Identity, citizenship and belonging
among settled Eastern European migrant
children and young people in the UK
Research Team

The research team includes researchers from the University of Strathclyde, University of Glasgow and Plymouth University.

Pic_DanielaSime Daniela Sime is the project manager. She is a Reader in Education and Social Policy in the School of Social Work & Social Policy, University of Strathclyde. Previously, she has worked as a researcher on a range of projects involving children, young people and families, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, British Academy, Save the Children, the Scottish Government. Her research interests include migrant children, marginalised groups (children in poverty, Roma and Gypsy Travellers), children as service users and the involvement of parents in children’s education. Daniela is an elected member of the Young Academy of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and an advisor to many voluntary sector organisations working with ethnic minority children and young people. Prior to working in Scotland, Daniela was a primary school teacher in her native country, Romania.
 Tyrrell_Naomi-pic Naomi Tyrrell is co-investigator in the project and a Senior Research Fellow in Human Geography at Plymouth University. Her teaching and research interests are in the broad field of population geography, with a focus on family migration processes and children’s geographies. She takes a children-inclusive approach to research and uses innovative and participatory methods to elicit children’s views. Naomi’s recently completed projects have focused on researcher mobility and family life in Europe (funded by the EU Commission), the impacts of child migration on later-life migration (funded by British Academy and Leverhulme Trust), and language and intergenerational relationships in migrant families (funded by Plymouth University), and the Migrant Children Project 2006-2009 based at University College Cork, Ireland (funded by the European Commission).
  Marta Moskal is co-investigator in this project and an Assistant Professor at Durham University. Her background is in social and public policy, human geography and sociology. Previously, she was Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow,  Marie Curie Research Fellow at the Centre of Educational Sociology at the University of Edinburgh and a Lecturer in Social and Political Geography at the Jagiellonina University in Krakow. Her research focuses on the processes of international mobility and education from the perspective of culture, identity change and social inclusion. Much of her work has explored Polish labour mobility and the experiences of migrant families and young people.
Pic_ClaireKelly Claire Kelly is a Research Fellow on this project, as well as a number of other human geography projects in the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at Plymouth University. Her research interests span social capital, community resilience, people’s relationship to place, and participatory research methods. She has worked with both young and old alike on many projects and one of her favourite things is hearing people tell their stories. Outside the university, Claire has extensive experience of engagement with communities through various development projects, and on a personal level as a long-term volunteer in a project in her home community.
 christina1  Christina McMellon is a Research Fellow on the project, based at Strathclyde University. Christina has a professional background in Community Education and working with young people with diverse life experiences. She returned to University in 2009 and completed her MSc. and PhD in Childhood Studies at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, based at Edinburgh University. Christina is particularly interested in participatory research with young people and service users, research ethics, young people’s participation, community engagement and subjective well-being. Christina loves to travel and much of her work includes cross-cultural aspects.